Difference between GETDATE() vs SYSDATETIME() vs GETUTCDATE() in SQL Server

One of the common question on Microsoft SQL Server interview is, what is the difference between GETDATE(), SYSDATETIME(), and GETUTCDATE(). Even though all three SQL Sever function returns the current date time in SQL Server, there are some subtle differences between them. The main difference between GETDATE() and SYSDATETIME() is that GETDATE returns current date and time as DATETIME but SYSDATETIME returns a DATETIME2 value, which is more precise. The difference between GETDATE() and GETUTCDATE() is in timezone, the GETDATE() function return current date and time in the local timezone, the timezone where your database server is running, but GETUTCDATE() return current time and date in UTC (Universal Time Coordinate) or GMT timezone.

Top 2 Books for OCPJP8 Certification - Java 8 1Z0-809, 810, 813 Exam

This is the second part of best books for Java 8 certifications. Since you need to pass two exams, OCAJP8 and OCPJP8 to become a Java SE 8 certified developer, I have shared some of the best OCAJP8 books in the last article. In this article, I will tell you more about the second exam OCPJP8 and suggest best books prepare OCPJP8. This exam is known as professional level exam and it's tougher than the associate level exam. The OCPJP8 stands for Oracle Certified Professional Java Programmer. The exam code for this certification is 1Z0-809. This is if you don't have any prior Java certifications but you can still become a Java SE 8 certified developer by giving upgrade exams e.g. 1Z0-810 if you already passed the OCJPJP7 exam and 1z0-813 if you have passed OCPJP6 exams. The books suggested in this article is primarily for the 1Z0-809 exam but it can also be used for upgrade exams e.g. 1Z0-810 (upgrade from Java SE 7 to Java SE 8) and 1Z0-813 (upgrade from Java SE 6 to Java SE 8) certifications.

2 Ways to find Tomcat and Java Version in Linux and Windows

You can find Tomcat and java version running on Linux either by executing the org.apache.catalina.util.ServerInfo class from catalina.jar or by executing version.sh shell script. The first solution will work on any operating system including Windows and UNIX because it's using a Java class from a catalina.jar file, which is platform independent. Though, if you don't know how to run a class from JAR file, you can check the steps here. Alternatively, you also have a version.bat file inside tomcat/bin directory to check the version of Tomcat in Windows. When you run this script in Linux or Windows it prints information about tomcat version, the java version used to run tomcat, Server built date, OS name, OS Version, architecture, JVM version and JVM vendor etc.